Spurgeon: Better Farther On

I’ve been reading Spurgeon’s Faith’s Checkbook recently. It’s a great tool for regularly reminding myself of the gospel and its implications.  I was particularly struck by his entry based on Nahum 1:12:

There is a limit to affliction.  God sends it, and God removes it.  Do you sigh and say, “When will the end be?” Remember that our griefs will surely and finally end when this poor earthly life is over. Let us quietly wait and patiently endure the will of the Lord till he cometh.

Meanwhile, our Father in heaven takes away the rod when His design in using it is fully served. When He has whipped away our folly, there will be no more strokes. Or, if the affliction is sent for testing us, that our graces may glorify  God, it will end when the Lord has made us bear witness to His praise. We would not wish the affliction to depart till God has gotten out of us all the honor which we can possibly yield Him.

There may today be “a great calm.” Who knows how soon those raging billows will give place to a sea of glass, and the sea birds sit on the gentle waves? After long tribulation the Rail is hung up, and the wheat rests in the garner. We may, before many hours are past, be just as happy as now we are sorrowful. It is not hard for the Lord to turn night into day. He that sends the clouds can as easily clear the skies. Let us be of good cheer. It is better on before. Let us sing hallelujah by anticipation.

Standing secure, looking forward

“Through him we have also obtained access into this grace in which we stand, and we rejoice in hope of the glory of God.” (Romans 5:2)

As I purposefully arm myself with the truth of the gospel against Satan’s attacks, I find Romans 5:1-11 to be particularly helpful.  In this passage there is a powerful list of reminders about the gospel and its implications for me.  In this verse, there are at least two.

First, I stand in grace.  My justification by faith does not usher me into a state of tenuous obligation.  It is not my job to sustain God’s kind intentions toward me.  Certainly, I am obligated to obey the Lord.  But that obligation is not smuggled into my life inside the otherwise good gift of the gospel.  It is a good part of the gospel itself.  Through the finished work of Christ and my union with him, I can now “walk in newness of life” (Rom. 6:4).  That, along with my perfect acceptance before God, is what grace gives to me.

Second, I can gladly and confidently look forward to a full experience of the glory of God.  Sometimes I’m too vague in the way I envision this experience.  The glory of God is not just a light so bright you can’t quite look at it.  The glory of God is the combined expression of everything that is good about him (in other words, everything that is true about him).  My enjoyment of the kindness, intelligence, attractiveness and abilities of others in this life serves as a tiny spark of what it will be like to enjoy the glory of God.  I will spend eternity benefiting from his inexhaustible kindness (Eph. 2:7), being impressed by his unstoppable power, and unpacking the intricate wisdom of his plan to redeem his people.

Yet my experience of God’s glory will not only come through observation.  It will be even more personal than that.  I have sinned, and in my present state, I fall short of the glory of God.  I fail to glorify him by failing to be glorious like him.  I don’t live up to his glorious character.  But in eternity, that will no longer be the case.  When Christ is revealed, I will be revealed with him in glory (Col. 3:4).  From that point on and forever, I will be unhindered in my expression of the righteousness of Christ that I have received through the gospel.  I will no longer fall short of the glory of God.